Sermons

Sermon • January 17, 2021

There was a government official who was pacing around late at night. He was anxious about upcoming events. The year was 1653, and Bulstrode Whitelock was being sent to Sweden as an ambassador of England. His own country had just survived a civil war, and England had executed its own king, Charles I, only a few years earlier.

Saying Yes

Ever since I was a little girl, Mary has captured my spiritual imagination. Mary was the one God chose to bear his Son. And Mary was the one who said Yes.

Joseph and the Grace of Redemption

Before moving up here last summer, I lived across the street from an art gallery in Hattiesburg, MS, and one day while walking around the neighborhood, I saw some unfamiliar art in the window. I went inside, and I learned that it was a Japanese form of art called Kintsugi, and it’s a remarkable method of repair…

Nothing Can Separate Us from the Love of Christ

In Romans, St. Paul personifies God’s hidden action during times of transition as a woman in labor.

“We know that the whole creation has been groaning in labor pains until now, and not only the creation, but we ourselves, who have the first-fruits of the Spirit, groan inwardly while we wait.”

Reflecting on the birth image, last Sunday we pondered what God might be laboring to birth in the midst of this worldwide pandemic and civil and political unrest.

Groaning with Hope in the In-Between Time

Today’s passages from Romans and the Psalms paint some of the most earthy, intimate, and reassuring images of God. They evoke the myriad, mixed emotions of a woman in labor – one of the most challenging, and most rewarding, experiences in life.

Here I am!

When God summons Abraham to the unthinkable, the unreasonable, the impossible, how does Abraham respond? He simply answers, “Here I am.”

Homily | Sunday, June 21, 2020

​These words of Jesus do not make an ideal message for a Father’s Day card. We hear of a sword, family disputes, questions about worthiness and life and death. This Gospel passage does not seem ideal for our environment, either, when so much already feels on edge. During these days, we bring a litany of concerns to God, concerns about illness, injustice, economic anxiety, and it’s hard to hear that Jesus brings a sword when we’d prefer something else.

Hope Takes Us by Surprise. Hope Does Not Disappoint.

A world drowning in discouragement, fear and despair desperately gasps for hope.

We hope someday all the suffering and death related to the pandemic and civil unrest will mean something. We hope all of God’s beloved children will one day be freed from oppressive structures. We hope God’s love and peace will be victorious over sin, unforgiveness and violence.

Yes, we hope God is going to redeem all of it in the end. But what about today? Do you feel disappointed in what seems a lack of divine intervention and healing? How can we shake this hopelessness: Where do we find hope for now?